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Thor: God of Thunder

Thor has a fascinating origin story that’s quite different from how the world has come to know him. According to Snorri Sturluson, the 13th-century Icelandic historian who wrote the Prose Edda (which to this day remains our main and most complete source of Old Norse religion and mythology), Thor actually descends from Troy. Yes, the ancient kingdom Greeks laid siege on for ten years before using the Trojan Horse to sneakily win the war. Sturluson says Thor, also known as Tror, was the son of a Trojan prince who survived the war and was raised in Thrace, in northern Greece. He was often compared to Zeus, the Greek god of thunder, and Herakles. He’s supposed to have “fair hair,” and in some depictions, he’s seen as a pagan priest. His descendants followed the Germanic tribes to the north of Europe, and his twelfth descendant, Woden, became celebrated as a god amongst the Germans and Scandinavians. A very interesting tidbit in this story is that “Asgard,” the legendary realm that was home of the gods, according to Sturluson, meant “the city in the east,” a reference to Troy — and “Aesir” meant “the gods from the east.”

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Metaphysical Connectivity – Part Two

In my previous essay about Connectivity, I said, our life spark is connected to the great consciousness and therefore everything, everywhere everywhen. In theory we should be able to shift our consciousness to any point of Time and Space. In theory, yes. But in applied practice there are some nagging kinks. For about twenty years I taught classes in Remote Viewing or RV to my students and others from the pagan community. Now I hear some witch-oriented people moaning “Remote Viewing is not Witchcraft, it’s not the old ways.” I beg to differ. Think of it as a modern disciplined approach to the old skill of divining. 

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The Magickal Properties of Lavender

Mother Nature has all the remedies we need — and as witches, it’s important to know how to harness them through working with herbs and plants. Throughout this series of articles, we’ve examined some of the key herbs to work with for healing, spells, and divination rituals. After learning about the magickal properties of jasmine and clover, it’s time to look at another favorite: lavender.

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Patron Deities of Solitary Witches

Solitary Witches are Witches who prefer to practice their Craft on their own rather than in a Coven. While magick can be stronger when performed in a group, it is not necessary for all Witches. Solitary Witches can be just as powerful as Witches within a Coven, and they only need to adapt to practicing magick alone rather than in a group. One of the things Witches need to adjust when practicing alone is the Deities that they chose to work with. Any Deity has the potential to help a Solitary Witch, but some seek out solo Witches more than others. These Deities help Solitary Witches more since Solitary Witches need the extra help to perform certain spells or rituals that may have better results performed through a Coven. If you are a Solitary Witch and are looking for a Deity that can help boost your magickal abilities, then keep on reading. You should be able to find or at least get an idea of the deities that will work best with solo Witches and try to reach out to the one that calls out to you the most. Let’s look at these Deities and what you can do to reach out to them.

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Growing Your Coven Membership

Growing your coven membership can be difficult in a practice that does not proselytize or actively recruit. Plus, with paganism being a new religion that is often misunderstood by the general public, many practitioners don’t blatantly display their faith, so others might not even know they are a practitioner. But if pagans and Wiccans don’t recruit, how can they find new members? The majority of people learn about paganism and Wicca through books, online, or from close friends.

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Gods and Goddesses of Fertility

Celebrating fertility has been very important to our Pagan ancestors. It had to be, of course. Whether it was to help secure the birth of new human (or animal) life or to coax rain to fall to make the land fertile, every pagan pantheon had its own gods and goddesses of fertility — many of who are still very much celebrated to this day. As Beltane, the great Wiccan Sabbat of union and fertility, draws near, it’s a great opportunity to get to know these gods and goddesses a bit better so that you can include them in your Beltane altar and ask for their blessing.

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The Goddess Isis

Isis is one of the most important goddesses of Egypt. She is considered to be  the mother of all Egyptian gods, as she is seen as a good wife and a role model. While she is highly crucial to Egyptian culture, her name and power go beyond the Egyptian border. She has become an important goddess in many major religions throughout the centuries, including Paganism and Witchcraft. Isis is worshipped throughout the world by Witches for her strong feminine image and for the power that she carries. But, before we get to how Isis is worshipped today by Witches, let us look at her legends and stories to see why she is so important to many religions around the globe.

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Metaphysical Connectivity – Part One

It is often said in mysticism that we are connected to an immediate local group of spirit instances. Lifetime after lifetime, we reincarnate together. My daughter in this lifetime may have been my mother in a previous life or perhaps my military captain, or even simply a colleague in a common profession, who knows. Lifetime after lifetime, we all wear different masks-of-flesh and participate in this game of incarnate life.

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The Air Element

Whether you are new to Wicca or have been practicing for a while, it is always a good time to brush up on your knowledge of those aspects of the Craft that are invoked frequently. In many altar setups, spells, and rituals, the four elements are called upon or used. Though Air is the least tangible and visible of the elements, we still frequently incorporate it into our practice.

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The Goddess Hera

Hera was worshipped in Greece way before people started speaking Greek there. She was the first deity to whom the people of that area ever dedicated a temple; she was worshipped all the way from Iran to Egypt. She’s often conflated with the Egyptian Goddess of fertility and agriculture, Hathor, and with Demeter, the Earth Goddess. Hera’s name probably comes from an older form of the word for “Lady” (Kera) but adapted to mean “Lady of the year” or “Lady of the season.” Some historians think it’s an anagram for the word for “air,” as Hera was considered the Queen of the Skies, or the Heavens. Just as Freya, the Lady of the Old Norse pantheon, played a much more important part in the past before her role was diminished to not antagonize Odin, so did Hera. Prior to her marriage to Zeus, Hera was considered a manifestation of the Great Earth Goddess in all her three aspects: Maiden, Mother, and Crone.

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